Micropropulsion devices based on molecular acceleration by pulsed optical lattices

Mikhail N. Shneider, Sergey F. Gimelshein, Peter F. Barker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The ability of a traveling periodic optical potential to increase the thrust and specific impulse of microthrusters is investigated. Two flow regimes, high density and low density, are considered. The thrust from a micronozzle, with a stagnation pressure of 1 atm and temperature of 300 K, can be increased by more than an order of magnitude. These conditions can be achieved for a constant velocity lattice, produced by two near counterpropagating optical fields that are focused into the nozzle throat. A propulsion system that operates in low-density regime and is driven by molecules trapped by an accelerating optical lattice is proposed. It is shown that such a system has a potential to achieve a specific impulse of thousands of seconds. © 2006 American Institute of Physics.

Original languageEnglish
Article number063102
JournalJournal of Applied Physics
Volume99
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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specific impulse
thrust
stagnation pressure
throats
propulsion
nozzles
impulses
physics
molecules
temperature

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Shneider, Mikhail N. ; Gimelshein, Sergey F. ; Barker, Peter F. / Micropropulsion devices based on molecular acceleration by pulsed optical lattices. In: Journal of Applied Physics. 2006 ; Vol. 99, No. 6.
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Micropropulsion devices based on molecular acceleration by pulsed optical lattices. / Shneider, Mikhail N.; Gimelshein, Sergey F.; Barker, Peter F.

In: Journal of Applied Physics, Vol. 99, No. 6, 063102, 2006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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