Mapping the distribution of coral reefs and associated sublittoral habitats in Pacific Panama: A comparison of optical satellite sensors and classification methodologies

S. L. Benfield, H. M. Guzman, J. M. Mair, J. A T Young

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    93 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This research compared the ability of Landsat ETM+, Quickbird and three image classification methods for discriminating amongst coral reefs and associated habitats in Pacific Panama. Landsat ETM+ and Quickbird were able to discriminate coarse and intermediate habitat classes, but this was sensitive to classification method. Quickbird was significantly more accurate than Landsat (14% to 17%). Contextual editing was found to improve the user's accuracy of important habitats. The integration of object-oriented classification with non-spectral information in eCognition produced the most accurate results. This method allowed sufficiently accurate maps to be produced from Landsat, which was not possible using the maximum likelihood classifier. Object-oriented classification was up to 24% more accurate than the maximum likelihood classifier for Landsat and up to 17% more accurate for Quickbird. The research indicates that classification methodology should be an important consideration in coral reef remote sensing. An object-oriented approach to image classification shows potential for improving coral reef resource inventory.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)5047-5070
    Number of pages24
    JournalInternational Journal of Remote Sensing
    Volume28
    Issue number22
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 20 Nov 2007

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