Majority members’ acculturation: How proximal-acculturation relates to expectations of immigrants and intergroup ideologies over time

Katharina Lefringhausen, Tara C. Marshall, Nelli Ferenczi, Hanna Zagefka, Jonas R. Kunst

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Abstract

How do English majority members’ national culture maintenance and immigrant culture adoption (i.e., globalisation-based proximal-acculturation) predict their acculturation expectations (i.e., how they think immigrants should acculturate) and intergroup ideologies (i.e., how they think society should manage diversity)? Cross-sectional results (N = 220) supported hypothesised relationships using a variable- and person-centred approach: welcoming expectations/ideologies related positively to immigrant culture adoption (or an integration/assimilation strategy) and negatively to national culture maintenance (or a separation strategy), whilst the reverse was true for unwelcoming expectations/ideologies. Notably, colourblindness showed only weak correlations with/differences across acculturation orientations/strategies. In longitudinal analyses, adopting immigrants’ cultures increased the intergroup ideologies polyculturalism and multiculturalism whilst reducing support for assimilation over time, whereas national culture maintenance had the opposite effect. Meanwhile, the expectation integration-transformation was especially related to higher odds of following an integration rather than separation strategy over time. Overall, results advance the psychological study of multiculturalism, providing first longitudinal insights on majority members’ acculturation.
Original languageEnglish
JournalGroup Processes and Intergroup Relations
Early online date13 May 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 13 May 2022

Keywords

  • acculturation expectations
  • globalisation
  • multiculturalism
  • intergroup ideologies
  • majority members' acculturation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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