Laboratory experiments and field study for the detection and monitoring of potential seepage from CO2 storage sites

Giorgio Caramanna, Yang Wei, M Mercedes Maroto-Valer, Paul Nathanail, Mike Steven

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9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Potential CO2 seepages from geological storage sites or from the injection rig may affect the surrounding environment. To develop reliable detection techniques for such seepages a laboratory rig was designed that is composed of three vertical Plexiglas columns. The columns can be filled with sediments and water; CO2 can be injected from the bottom. Two columns are used to simulate the impact of CO2 on soils; while the third one, which is larger in size, simulates CO2 seepage in aquatic environments. The main results of the laboratory experiments indicate that increased levels of CO2 generate a quick drop in pH. Once the seepage is stopped, a partial recovery towards the initial values of pH is recorded. The outcomes of the laboratory experiments on the aquatic seepage are compared with observations from a submarine natural emission of CO2. In this natural underwater seepage multi-parametric probes and laboratory analysis were used to analyze the composition and the chemical effects of the emitted gas; basic acoustic techniques were tested as tools for the prompt detection of CO2 bubbles in water. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)105-113
Number of pages9
JournalApplied Geochemistry
Volume30
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2013

Keywords

  • PANAREA AEOLIAN ISLANDS
  • SOIL COLUMN
  • MEDITERRANEAN SEA
  • SOLUTE TRANSPORT
  • BUBBLE PLUMES
  • GAS ERUPTION
  • CHEMISTRY
  • CHAMBER
  • EFFLUX
  • ACCUMULATION

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