K+ accumulation and K+ conductance inactivation during action potential trains in giant axons of the squid Sepioteuthis

Isao Inoue, Izuo Tsutsui, Euan R. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

1. During action potential trains in giant axons from the squid Sepioteuthis, decline of the peak level of the undershoot potential was observed. The time course of the decline of the undershoot could be fitted with a three-exponential function with time constants of ~ 25, ~ 400 and ~ 7000 ms, respectively. 2. When the osmolarity of the external solution was doubled by adding glucose (1.2 M), the fast component of undershoot decline, but not the medium and slow components, was significantly reduced. 3. Under voltage clamp in high osmolarity solutions where K+ accumulation was completely removed, repeated depolarizing pulses at 40 Hz (designed to mimic a train of action potentials) elicited K+ currents whose peak value declined. The decline is consistent with inactivation of the K+ conductance (g(K)). The decline of g(K) was fitted by a two-exponential function with time constants of ~ 400 and ~ 7000 ms, respectively. 4. Interventions designed to modify Schwann cell physiology, such as high frequency stimulation (100 Hz, 2 min), externally applied ouabain (100-500 μM), L-glatamate (100 μM), ACh (100 μM), Co2+ (5 mM), Ba2+ (2 mM), or removal of external Ca2+ by EGTA, had no significant effects on the fast, medium or slow components of undershoot decline. 5. The results suggest that the fast component of undershoot decline represents K+ accumulation in the space between Schwann cell and axolemma. The medium and slow components are the result of axonal g(K) inactivation. Schwann cells appear to be involved in K+ clearance only to the extent that they provide an efficient physical pathway for the clearance of K+ by extracellular diffusion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)355-366
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Physiology
Volume500
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Apr 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

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