Investigating the nature and origins of Gaping Gill Main Chamber, North Yorkshire, UK, using ground penetrating radar and lidar

Phillip J. Murphy, Ailsa Parr, Kate Strange, Graham Hunter, Sam Allshorn, Ric A. Halliwell, John Helm, A. Robin Westerman

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    The paper reports on a first application of ground penetrating radar (GPR) and lidar (LIght Distance and Ranging) in Gaping Gill Main Chamber (GGMC). The GPR image quality is exceptionally good. Sedimentary structures are clearly recognizable down to 30m below the chamber floor. We compare the sequence stratigraphy with the stepped velocity profile and a century of flood history and suggest a link between the sequence of flow directions and the last five interglacial events. In that scenario, the GGMC roof was breached at the beginning of the last Pleistocene interglacial, reversing floodwater flow directions in the chamber. We compare estimated process rates with that time-scale. Lidar surveys provide accurate spatial measurements. The GPR-estimated minimum sediment volume beneath the chamber floor is about 1.8 times the lidar-measured chamber volume above. As a 3-D "base survey", the 2003 lidar data will allow timelapse, or '4-D' monitoring of any future changes in GGMC. © British Cave Research Association, 2005.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)25-38
    Number of pages14
    JournalCave and Karst Science
    Volume32
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - 2005

    Fingerprint

    ground penetrating radar
    Last Interglacial
    sequence stratigraphy
    sedimentary structure
    velocity profile
    interglacial
    lidar
    roof
    cave
    Pleistocene
    timescale
    monitoring
    history
    sediment

    Keywords

    • Flow
    • Gaping Gill
    • GPR
    • Karst
    • Lidar
    • Sequence stratigraphy

    Cite this

    Murphy, P. J., Parr, A., Strange, K., Hunter, G., Allshorn, S., Halliwell, R. A., ... Westerman, A. R. (2005). Investigating the nature and origins of Gaping Gill Main Chamber, North Yorkshire, UK, using ground penetrating radar and lidar. Cave and Karst Science, 32(1), 25-38.
    Murphy, Phillip J. ; Parr, Ailsa ; Strange, Kate ; Hunter, Graham ; Allshorn, Sam ; Halliwell, Ric A. ; Helm, John ; Westerman, A. Robin. / Investigating the nature and origins of Gaping Gill Main Chamber, North Yorkshire, UK, using ground penetrating radar and lidar. In: Cave and Karst Science. 2005 ; Vol. 32, No. 1. pp. 25-38.
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    Murphy, PJ, Parr, A, Strange, K, Hunter, G, Allshorn, S, Halliwell, RA, Helm, J & Westerman, AR 2005, 'Investigating the nature and origins of Gaping Gill Main Chamber, North Yorkshire, UK, using ground penetrating radar and lidar', Cave and Karst Science, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 25-38.

    Investigating the nature and origins of Gaping Gill Main Chamber, North Yorkshire, UK, using ground penetrating radar and lidar. / Murphy, Phillip J.; Parr, Ailsa; Strange, Kate; Hunter, Graham; Allshorn, Sam; Halliwell, Ric A.; Helm, John; Westerman, A. Robin.

    In: Cave and Karst Science, Vol. 32, No. 1, 2005, p. 25-38.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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