Investigating the biomolecular interactions between model proteins and glycine betaine surfactant with reference to the stabilization of emulsions and antimicrobial properties

Tomasz Janek, Karina Salek, Joanna Burger, Żaneta Czyżnikowska, Stephen Robert Euston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Binding effect and interaction of 2-pentadecanoyloxymethyl)trimethylammonium bromide (DMGM-14) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) were systematically investigated by the fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), surface tension analysis, and molecular docking studies. The emulsion properties and particle size distribution of surfactant/protein complexes containing sunflower oil were studied using static light scattering and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The fluorescence spectroscopy and ITC analysis confirmed the complexes formation of DMGM-14 with BSA and HEWL which was also verified by surface tension measurements. CD results explained the conformational changes in BSA and HEWL upon DMGM-14 complexation. Molecular docking study provides insight into the binding of DMGM-14 into the specific sites of BSA and HEWL. Besides, the studies drew a detailed picture on the emulsification properties of DMGM-14 with BSA and HEWL. In addition, the in vitro experiment revealed a broad antibacterial spectrum of DMGM-14 and DMGM-14/HEWL complex including activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In conclusion, the present study revealed that the interaction between DMGM-14 with BSA and HEWL is important for the pharmaceutical, biological, and food products.
Original languageEnglish
Article number111226
JournalColloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces
Volume194
Early online date26 Jun 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2020

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