Influence of carbon dioxide on growth and antibiotic susceptibility of coagulase-negative staphylococci cultured in human peritoneal dialysate

Mark H. Wilcox, David George Emslie Smith, J. A. Evans, Stephen P. Denyer, Roger G. Finch, Paul Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Used peritoneal dialysis fluid was collected from patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis, and its pH and composition were assessed after incubation in either air or air with 5% CO2. Precipitation of calcium, magnesium, phosphate, and proteins occurred in the dialysis fluid incubated in air at 37 degrees C and was associated with a mean pH increase of 1.23 U. Incubation of dialysis fluid in air with 5% CO2 prevented precipitation and maintained pCO2 and pH levels at those found physiologically. Coagulase-negative staphylococcal strains isolated from patients with peritonitis tended to grow less well in dialysis fluid incubated in air than in dialysis fluid incubated in the carbon dioxide-enriched atmosphere. MICs of cefuroxime, ciprofloxacin, and vancomycin for seven strains of coagulase-negative staphylococci in dialysis fluid were markedly affected by atmosphere type (16 of 21 MICs). Of these 16 atmosphere-dependent MICs, 14 were at least fourfold higher in air than in air with 5% CO2.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2183-2186
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Clinical Microbiology
Volume28
Issue number10
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1990

Keywords

  • Air
  • Ascitic Fluid
  • Bacteriological Techniques
  • Carbon Dioxide
  • Culture Media
  • Dialysis Solutions
  • Drug Resistance, Microbial
  • Humans
  • Peritoneal Dialysis, Continuous Ambulatory
  • Peritonitis
  • Staphylococcal Infections
  • Staphylococcus

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