Impact of Conventional and Integrated Management Systems on the Water-Soluble Vitamin Content in Potatoes, Field Beans, and Cereals

Sabine Freitag*, Susan R. Verrall, Simon D. A. Pont, Diane McRae, Julia A. Sungurtas, Raphaëlle Palau, Cathy Hawes, Colin J. Alexander, J. William Allwood, Alexandre Foito, Derek Stewart, Louise Vida Traill Shepherd

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The reduction of the environmental footprint of crop production without compromising crop yield and their nutritional value is a key goal for improving the sustainability of agriculture. In 2009, the Balruddery Farm Platform was established at The James Hutton Institute as a long-term experimental platform for cross-disciplinary research of crops using two agricultural ecosystems. Crops representative of UK agriculture were grown under conventional and integrated management systems and analyzed for their water-soluble vitamin content. Integrated management, when compared with the conventional system, had only minor effects on water-soluble vitamin content, where significantly higher differences were seen for the conventional management practice on the levels of thiamine in field beans (p < 0.01), Spring barley (p < 0.05), and Winter wheat (p < 0.05), and for nicotinic acid in Spring barley (p < 0.05). However, for all crops, variety and year differences were of greater importance. These results indicate that the integrated management system described in this study does not significantly affect the water-soluble vitamin content of the crops analyzed here.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)831-841
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Volume66
Issue number4
Early online date19 Dec 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Jan 2018

Keywords

  • barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)
  • field beans (Vicia faba L.)
  • integrated management
  • liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry
  • potato (Solanum tuberosum L.)
  • water-soluble vitamins (WSVs)
  • wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Chemistry
  • General Agricultural and Biological Sciences

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Impact of Conventional and Integrated Management Systems on the Water-Soluble Vitamin Content in Potatoes, Field Beans, and Cereals'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this