If a tree falls in a forest and no one is there to hear it, does it make a noise? The merits of publishing interpreting research

Jemina Napier*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As an interdisciplinary research-based literature on interpreting emerges in spoken and signed language interpreting studies, this chapter provides an overview of publishing interpreting research for novice researchers seeking advice on publication. The chapter walks potential researchers through types of research projects and appropriate publication outlets. The importance of publishing interpreting research is discussed in light of the benefits for students, practitioners, educators, researchers and other stakeholders. In particular, the chapter discusses how interpreters can become involved in conducting and publishing research through “interpreter fieldwork research”. The chapter emphasizes the need to draw together practice, experience and academic pursuit to make research accessible to all stakeholders in various forms of publications.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Interpreting Research
Subtitle of host publicationInquiry in action
EditorsBrenda Nicodemus, Laurie Swabey
PublisherJohn Benjamins Publishing Company
Pages121-152
Number of pages32
ISBN (Electronic)9789027283023
ISBN (Print)9789027224477
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Publication series

NameBenjamins Translation Library
Volume99
ISSN (Print)0929-7316

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Literature and Literary Theory

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