Identity development in the Caribbean: Measuring socio-historic structures with psychological variables

Mary Arneaud, Nicole Alea

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Abstract

The purpose of this article is to discuss how scientific Caribbean psychological scholarship might advance by examining indigenous theories and discourse to identify culturally-relevant variables that might account for differences among social groups (e.g. class, ethnic), and which may in turn explain outcomes of interest. Identity development is used as an example. The theory of plantation economy, and Best’s (2001) discourse on race, class, and ethnicity in the Caribbean are examined. Locus of control and values emerge as culturally-relevant psychological variables that might account for differences among social groups, based on their varying experiences of the region’s socio-history; and perhaps variables that might account for group differences in identity development. Empirical research linking these variables is briefly reviewed. Suggestions to guide future studies are made.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)339-346
Number of pages8
JournalInteramerican Journal of Psychology
Volume47
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Keywords

  • Caribbean, social groups, identity development, locus of control, values

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Psychology

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