HUMAN CAUSE OF FAILURE IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY.

P. Jackson

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    Before the partial collapse of the tower block, Ronan Point, there was a general belief that buildings failed mainly as a consequence of natural disaster or unavoidable long-term decay. Since then, many modern buildings have either partially failed, or have suffered rapid deterioration, as a result of design and/or construction mistakes which could have been avoided. Some structures have collapsed. With the exception of a few industrial processes, the performance requirements of buildings are well understood. Furthermore, there is no lack of conventionally trained professional staff and there exists an active programme of research and development. Nevertheless, there is an increasing number of failures in modern construction and it would seem prudent to identify the causes of these failures and to minimise them.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings - Advances in Reliability Technology Symposium
    Subtitle of host publicationProceedings - 9th Advances in Reliability Technology Symposium: ARTS 86.; Bradford, England
    PagesB3. 2. 1-B3. 2. 6
    Publication statusPublished - 1986

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'HUMAN CAUSE OF FAILURE IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Jackson, P. (1986). HUMAN CAUSE OF FAILURE IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY. In Proceedings - Advances in Reliability Technology Symposium: Proceedings - 9th Advances in Reliability Technology Symposium: ARTS 86.; Bradford, England (pp. B3. 2. 1-B3. 2. 6)