Higher urinary heavy metal, phthalate and arsenic concentrations accounted for 3-19% of the population attributable risk for high blood pressure: US NHANES, 2009-2012

Ivy Shiue, Krasimira Hristova

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The link between environmental chemicals and human health has emerged, but has not been completely examined in terms of its risk factors. Therefore, we aimed to study the relationships of different sets of urinary environmental chemical concentrations and high blood pressure (BP) in a national, population-based study. Data were retrieved from the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, 2009-2012, including demographics, BP readings and urinary environmental chemical concentrations. Analyses included chi(2)-test, t-test, survey-weighted logistic regression models and population attributable risk estimation. Urinary cesium (odds ratio (OR) 1.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-2.18, P = 0.026), molybdenum (OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.04-2.02, P = 0.029), lead (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.12-1.98, P = 0.009), platinum (OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.14-2.21, P = 0.002), antimony (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.12-1.86, P = 0.008) and tungsten (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.22-1.79, P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1075-1081
Number of pages7
JournalHypertension Research
Volume37
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2014

Keywords

  • blood pressure
  • chemicals
  • environmental health
  • etiology
  • risk factor
  • population attributable risk
  • CHLORIDE-INDUCED ARRHYTHMIAS
  • MASS-SPECTROMETRY
  • NATIONAL-HEALTH
  • TUNGSTEN COILS
  • BISPHENOL-A
  • IN-VITRO
  • HYPERTENSION
  • METABOLITES
  • EXPOSURE
  • LEAD

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