Graduate engineers' perceptions of their engineering courses: Comparison between enhanced engineering courses and their conventional counterparts

Tony Keenan

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    The Dainton enhanced engineering courses were designed to produce engineers who would be better prepared for careers in manufacturing management than their counterparts from conventional engineering programmes. As part of a large scale evaluation of these courses, the views of 167 students and 220 graduates of the programmes were compared with those of a control group of 353 students from conventional engineering courses. Respondents were asked for their opinions of 19 course elements in terms of the amount of time devoted to each as a preparation for a career as a professional engineer in industry. In general, enhanced students viewed their courses more favourably than students from conventional courses. Thus, over half of the conventional students criticised their courses for a lack of business and management material, compared with less than one in five enhanced students. There were few differences between the two groups in their views about the technical content of their courses. Criticisms about insufficient time being devoted to CADCAM, Engineering Practice, and Engineering Applications were common in students from both types of course. The views of enhanced graduates, who had up to five years' work experience post graduation, were similar to those of the undergraduates. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for engineering education in general. © 1993 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)255-265
    Number of pages11
    JournalHigher Education
    Volume26
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Oct 1993

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