Gender in the UK Architectural Profession: (re)producing and challenging hegemonic masculinity

Katherine Sang, Andrew Dainty, Stephen Ison

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Architecture represents a creative, high profile and influential profession and yet remains under-theorized from a gender perspective. This article examines how gender is (re)produced in architecture, a profession that remains strangely under-researched given its status and position. The empirical work advances the theoretical concept of hegemonic masculinity via an analysis of gendered working practices and the agency of individuals through resistance and complicity with these norms. It reveals how architectural practice relies on long working hours, homosocial behaviour and creative control. However, whereas women perform their gender in ways which reproduce such gendered norms, white, heterosexual, middle class men can transgress them to challenge aspects of practice culture. This has significant implications for understanding the ways in which hegemonic masculinities are reproduced within creative workplaces.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)247-264
    Number of pages18
    JournalWork, Employment and Society
    Volume28
    Issue number2
    Early online date7 Jan 2014
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2014

    Fingerprint

    masculinity
    profession
    gender
    working hours
    middle class
    workplace

    Keywords

    • architects
    • gender
    • homosocial behaviour
    • masculinity
    • social networks
    • professional work
    • working hours
    • work life balance

    Cite this

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    abstract = "Architecture represents a creative, high profile and influential profession and yet remains under-theorized from a gender perspective. This article examines how gender is (re)produced in architecture, a profession that remains strangely under-researched given its status and position. The empirical work advances the theoretical concept of hegemonic masculinity via an analysis of gendered working practices and the agency of individuals through resistance and complicity with these norms. It reveals how architectural practice relies on long working hours, homosocial behaviour and creative control. However, whereas women perform their gender in ways which reproduce such gendered norms, white, heterosexual, middle class men can transgress them to challenge aspects of practice culture. This has significant implications for understanding the ways in which hegemonic masculinities are reproduced within creative workplaces.",
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    Gender in the UK Architectural Profession : (re)producing and challenging hegemonic masculinity. / Sang, Katherine; Dainty, Andrew; Ison, Stephen.

    In: Work, Employment and Society, Vol. 28, No. 2, 04.2014, p. 247-264.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    AU - Ison, Stephen

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    KW - homosocial behaviour

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    KW - social networks

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    KW - working hours

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