Further Analyses of the Dispositional Argument in Organizational Behavior

Tim Newton, Tony Keenan

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Dispositional and situational influences on organizational behavior were examined with reference to the job redesign literature, particularly the research of Staw and Ross (1985). Dispositional and situational influence was assessed through investigation of the stability of job attitudes and affect among young professional engineers experiencing situational change arising from (a) change from university studies to full-time employment and (b) change of employer. Although correlational analyses suggested attitude and affect stability, t test results indicated attitude and affect instability. The inconsistency of these findings are discussed, and methodological problems in research in this area are noted.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)781-787
    Number of pages7
    JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
    Volume76
    Issue number6
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 1991

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    organizational behavior
    engineer
    employer
    university

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    Newton, Tim ; Keenan, Tony. / Further Analyses of the Dispositional Argument in Organizational Behavior. In: Journal of Applied Psychology. 1991 ; Vol. 76, No. 6. pp. 781-787.
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    Further Analyses of the Dispositional Argument in Organizational Behavior. / Newton, Tim; Keenan, Tony.

    In: Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol. 76, No. 6, 12.1991, p. 781-787.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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