From molecular control to quantum technology with the dynamic Stark effect

Philip J. Bustard, Guorong Wu, Rune Lausten, David Townsend, Ian A. Walmsley, Albert Stolow, Benjamin J. Sussman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The non-resonant dynamic Stark effect is a powerful and general way of manipulating ultrafast processes in atoms, molecules, and solids with exquisite precision. We discuss the physics behind this effect, and demonstrate its efficacy as a method of control in a variety of systems. These applications range from the control of molecular rotational dynamics to the manipulation of chemical reaction dynamics, and from the suppression of vacuum fluctuation effects in coherent preparation of matter, to the dynamic generation of bandwidth for storage of broadband quantum states of light.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)321-342
Number of pages22
JournalFaraday Discussions
Volume153
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Cite this

Bustard, P. J., Wu, G., Lausten, R., Townsend, D., Walmsley, I. A., Stolow, A., & Sussman, B. J. (2011). From molecular control to quantum technology with the dynamic Stark effect. Faraday Discussions, 153, 321-342. https://doi.org/10.1039/c1fd00067e
Bustard, Philip J. ; Wu, Guorong ; Lausten, Rune ; Townsend, David ; Walmsley, Ian A. ; Stolow, Albert ; Sussman, Benjamin J. / From molecular control to quantum technology with the dynamic Stark effect. In: Faraday Discussions. 2011 ; Vol. 153. pp. 321-342.
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Bustard, PJ, Wu, G, Lausten, R, Townsend, D, Walmsley, IA, Stolow, A & Sussman, BJ 2011, 'From molecular control to quantum technology with the dynamic Stark effect', Faraday Discussions, vol. 153, pp. 321-342. https://doi.org/10.1039/c1fd00067e

From molecular control to quantum technology with the dynamic Stark effect. / Bustard, Philip J.; Wu, Guorong; Lausten, Rune; Townsend, David; Walmsley, Ian A.; Stolow, Albert; Sussman, Benjamin J.

In: Faraday Discussions, Vol. 153, 2011, p. 321-342.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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