Foveational complexity in single word identification: contralateral visual pathways are advantaged over ipsilateral pathways

Mateo Obregón, Richard Shillcock

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Recognition of a single word is an elemental task in innumerable cognitive psychology experiments, but involves unexpected complexity. We test a controversial claim that the human fovea is vertically divided, with each half projecting to either the contralateral or ipsilateral hemisphere, thereby influencing foveal word recognition. We report a novel haploscope task: the two halves of a four-letter word were briefly presented to the two eyes in a Both condition (st vertical bar ep)(st vertical bar ep), a Contralateral condition (st vertical bar_)(_vertical bar ep), or an Ipsilateral condition (_vertical bar ep)(st vertical bar_), all yielding the same single word percept (step). The Both condition yielded superior perceptual recognition, followed by the contralateral projection, then the ipsilateral projection. These results demonstrate that the structure of the fovea influences even the recognition of short, foveally presented words. Projecting different parts of the same word to different hemispheres involves unforeseen complexities and opportunities for optimizing hemispheric coordination. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)3279-3283
    Number of pages5
    JournalNeuropsychologia
    Volume50
    Issue number14
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 2012

    Keywords

    • Haploscope
    • Stereoscope
    • Word perception
    • Foveal splitting
    • Hemispheric processing
    • SPLIT PROCESSING MODEL
    • INTERHEMISPHERIC-TRANSFER
    • STRIATE CORTEX
    • FUNCTIONAL MRI
    • RECOGNITION
    • DOMINANCE
    • FOVEA
    • ACTIVATION
    • PATTERN

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