Fabrication of molecular-scale patterns with chemically tunable functionalities

Z. Liu, D. G. Bucknall, M. G. Allen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper presents a scalable hybrid molecular nanofabrication approach of sub-10 nm patterns with functionalized surfaces by combining "bottom-up" surface initiated polymerization (SIP) with "top-down" electron beam lithography (EBL). This prototype molecular nanofabrication is based on the concept of nanolithography-based molecular manipulation (NMM). The strategy is to apply free-radical SIP ("bottom-up") to the non-molecularly engineered and chemically inert nano-patterns prepared by "top-down" nanolithography, e.g. EBL. This integration can minimize feature sizes to molecular length scales (sub-10 nm) and simultaneously tune the surface chemistry of the nano-patterns through functional polymer brushes. In this work, 4 nm nanostructures have been obtained which are chemically functionalized by poly(vinyl pyridine) (PVP).

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationTRANSDUCERS 2009 - 15th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems
PublisherIEEE
Pages449-452
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-4244-4193-8
ISBN (Print)978-1-4244-4190-7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Event15th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems - Denver, CO, United States
Duration: 21 Jun 200925 Jun 2009

Conference

Conference15th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems
Abbreviated titleTRANSDUCERS 2009
CountryUnited States
CityDenver, CO
Period21/06/0925/06/09

Keywords

  • Chemically tunable functionality
  • Molecular nanotechnology
  • Nanofabrication
  • Surface initiated polymerization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hardware and Architecture
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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  • Cite this

    Liu, Z., Bucknall, D. G., & Allen, M. G. (2009). Fabrication of molecular-scale patterns with chemically tunable functionalities. In TRANSDUCERS 2009 - 15th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems (pp. 449-452). [5285467] IEEE. https://doi.org/10.1109/SENSOR.2009.5285467