Explaining tenancy sustainment rates in British social rented housing: The roles of management, vulnerability and choice

Hal Pawson, Moira Munro

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    14 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    High rates of tenancy turnover in social rented housing have increasingly been identified as problematic both in the UK and elsewhere. High turnover has been variously associated with management failings, individual vulnerability or (absence of) tenant choice. Drawing on original research into 'prematurely terminated' tenancies in Glasgow, we investigate explanatory factors associated with tenancy sustainment rates. In doing so, we interrogate the (managerialist) rationale which positions such residential mobility as potentially 'excessive' and therefore 'problematic'. The empirical findings demonstrate evidence for all three posited explanations for high tenancy turnover but also suggest that some tenants vacating their homes after only a short time may be making a positive choice. They also emphasise that, in seeking to reduce early tenancy termination, social landlords should recognise the importance of improving mainstream housing management services and the condition of the housing stock, as well as attempting to address individual vulnerability through targeted support. © 2010 Urban Studies Journal Limited.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)145-168
    Number of pages24
    JournalUrban Studies
    Volume47
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2010

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Explaining tenancy sustainment rates in British social rented housing: The roles of management, vulnerability and choice'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this