Examining the Correlates of HIV Testing for Venezuelan Migrants in Trinidad

Nyla Lyons*, Brendon Bhagwandeen, Jeffrey Edwards

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
24 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

An important preventive measure in the fight against the HIV epidemic is the adoption of HIV testing. The government of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago conducted a registration exercise in 2019 for undocumented migrants and refugees from Venezuela residing in the country. These migrants were allowed access to the public health system. In this study, we observed the correlates of HIV testing in Venezuelan migrants residing in Trinidad. A convenience sample of n = 250 migrants was collected via telephone survey from September through December 2020. Variables of interest included social factors, health needs, and uptake of HIV testing. Pearson χ2 tests examined the associations between study variables, and multivariable logistic regression with backward elimination produced the odds of taking an HIV test. In our study, 40.8% of migrants reported having received an HIV test since arriving in Trinidad. Persons who migrated with family or friends had greater odds of getting an HIV test relative to persons who arrived alone (OR = 2.912, 95% CI: 1.002–8.466), and migrants who knew where to get an HIV test also greater odds of getting a test relative to person who did not know where to get a test (OR = 3.173, 95% CI: 1.683–5.982). Migrants with known physical health problems had greater odds of getting an HIV test relative to migrants without these health problems (OR = 1.856, 95% CI: 1.032–3.337). Persons who arrived with family or friends had greater odds of experiencing difficulties accessing public health care relative to persons who arrived alone (OR = 3.572, 95% CI: 1.352–9.442). Migrants earning between $1000 and $2999 TT per month had greater odds of experiencing trouble accessing public health services relative to persons who had monthly earnings of less than $1000 TT (OR = 2.567, 95% CI: 1.252–5.264). This was the first quantitative study on HIV testing among Venezuelan migrants in Trinidad. Migrants still experience difficulties accessing healthcare, which, in turn influences national HIV prevention and control efforts. The results gathered may help in developing HIV prevention plans that are led by a national health policy that takes migrant communities’ needs into account.
Original languageEnglish
Article number2148
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume20
Issue number3
Early online date25 Jan 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2023

Keywords

  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • government policy
  • migrants
  • HIV testing
  • Trinidad and Tobago

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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