Engineering the Forth & Clyde and Union Canals (1768-1822), Scotland and their regeneration via the Falkirk Wheel (2000-2001)

R. Paxton

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    The 58 km. Forth & Clyde Ship Canal was created across Scotland between the North and Irish Seas from 1768 to 1790, then the world's deepest sea-to-sea canal. In 1822 it was joined near Falkirk by the smaller scale 50 km long Union Canal from Edinburgh by means of an impressive flight of 11 locks, now being replaced in use by the innovative "Falkirk Wheel" rotating boat lift, the key element in the £78m. Millennium Link canal regeneration project. This paper, essentially an enlargement of the historical comment in the Author's recent ICE Smeaton Lecture(1), relates to contemporary civil engineering practice on these navigations and its significance. It concludes with a description of the basic operational principles of the Falkirk Wheel.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationASCE Specialty Conference, Proceedings
    Pages41-49
    Number of pages9
    Publication statusPublished - 2001
    EventProceedings of the Third national Congress on Civil Engineering History and Heritage - Houston, TX, United States
    Duration: 10 Oct 200113 Oct 2001

    Conference

    ConferenceProceedings of the Third national Congress on Civil Engineering History and Heritage
    CountryUnited States
    CityHouston, TX
    Period10/10/0113/10/01

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