Engineered membranes for residual cell trapping on microfluidic blood plasma separation systems. A comparison between porous and nanofibrous membranes

Francesco Lopresti, Ieva Keraite, Alfredo Edoardo Ongaro, Nicola Marie Howarth, Vincenzo La Carrubba, Maïwenn Kersaudy-Kerhoas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Blood-based clinical diagnostics require challenging limit-of-detection for low abundance, circulating molecules in plasma. Micro-scale blood plasma separation (BPS) has achieved remarka-ble results in terms of plasma yield or purity, but rarely achieving both at the same time. Here, we proposed the first use of electrospun polylactic-acid (PLA) membranes as filters to remove residual cell population from continuous hydrodynamic-BPS devices. The membranes hydrophilicity was improved by adopting a wet chemistry approach via surface aminolysis as demonstrated through Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and Water Contact Angle analysis. The usability of PLA-membranes was assessed through degradation measurements at extreme pH values. Plasma purity and hemolysis were evaluated on plasma samples with residual red blood cell content (1, 3, 5% hematocrit) corresponding to output from existing hydrodynamic BPS systems. Commercially available membranes for BPS were used as benchmark. Results highlighted that the electrospun membranes are suitable for downstream residual cell removal from blood, permitting the collection of up to 2 mL of pure and low-hemolyzed plasma. Fluorometric DNA quantification revealed that electrospun membranes did not significantly affect the concentration of circulating DNA. PLA-based electrospun membranes can be combined with hydrodynamic BPS in order to achieve high volume plasma separation at over 99% plasma purity.

Original languageEnglish
Article number680
JournalMembranes
Volume11
Issue number9
Early online date31 Aug 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2021

Keywords

  • Biopolymers
  • Blood-plasma separation
  • Clinical applications
  • Membranes
  • Microfluidics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering (miscellaneous)
  • Process Chemistry and Technology
  • Filtration and Separation

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