Energy performance of housing in the Greater Dublin Area

Kirk Shanks, Gerry Wardell

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

    31 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Energy consumption in the housing stock accounts for 24% of Total Final Consumption in Ireland, with heating energy being a dominant end use. Identifying the influence of housing stock characteristics on heat energy consumption can aid targeted development of energy related policy to meet national objectives of environmental responsibility and security of supply. This paper reports a profiling study of the heat energy consumption of a representative sample of the housing stock in the Greater Dublin Area from the findings of an energy performance survey of Irish housing commissioned by the Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland (SEI). Theoretical and actual heat energy consumption of a sample of 64 dwellings representing the housing mix in the Greater Dublin Area is presented. Comparison of theoretical and actual heat energy consumption is discussed for a range of stock and individual house operational; fabric and heating system characteristics including results from airtightness testing and thermographic surveys to identify the predominant heat energy consumption drivers. The impact of historical changes in construction practices, design strategies and energy related regulatory instruments on theoretical and actual heat energy consumption are discussed.
    Original languageEnglish
    Publication statusPublished - 2006
    Event2nd International Solar Cities Congress - Oxford, United Kingdom
    Duration: 3 Apr 20066 Apr 2006

    Conference

    Conference2nd International Solar Cities Congress
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    CityOxford
    Period3/04/066/04/06

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Energy performance of housing in the Greater Dublin Area'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Shanks, K., & Wardell, G. (2006). Energy performance of housing in the Greater Dublin Area. Paper presented at 2nd International Solar Cities Congress , Oxford, United Kingdom.