Effects of wave energy extraction on intertidal species of extremely exposed rocky shores

Michael C. Bell, Andrew Want, Michael T. Burrows, Vengatesan Venugopal, Simon Mark Waldman, Jonathan Charles Side

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

Ecological responses to nearshore extraction of wave energy are expected to be most evident at the shore, where much of this energy would otherwise be expended. Extremely exposed shorelines are the best place to look for such responses, given that these are likely to be adjacent to the highest wave energy resources. Using survey data for the west coast of Mainland Orkney together with modelled wave height data from the EcoWatt 2050 project, we develop statistical models for the abundance of intertidal species characteristic of high exposure levels. Significant relationships with wave height are apparent for many species, even though all sites are at the high end of the spectrum of exposure, and shore topography is shown to be an important modifying factor. These models are projected for scenarios of future wave climate, demonstrating that climate change is expected to be the dominant driver of change in intertidal species. Both losses and gains are projected in response to extraction of wave energy, but these effects are relatively small. We discuss these findings in relation to uncertainties about other environmental drivers, and consider implications for acceptable levels of energy extraction.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 26 Apr 2018
EventInternational Conference on the Environmental Interactions of Marine Energy Technologies - Pickaquoy Centre, Kirkwall, Orkney, United Kingdom
Duration: 24 Apr 201827 Apr 2018
https://www.egis.hw.ac.uk/eimr2018/

Conference

ConferenceInternational Conference on the Environmental Interactions of Marine Energy Technologies
Abbreviated titleEIMR 2018
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityKirkwall, Orkney
Period24/04/1827/04/18
Internet address

Fingerprint

rocky shore
wave energy
wave height
wave climate
energy resource
energy
shoreline
topography
climate change
coast
effect
exposure

Keywords

  • Wave energy
  • Intertidal
  • Statistical modelling
  • climate change

Cite this

Bell, M. C., Want, A., Burrows, M. T., Venugopal, V., Waldman, S. M., & Side, J. C. (2018). Effects of wave energy extraction on intertidal species of extremely exposed rocky shores. Abstract from International Conference on the Environmental Interactions of Marine Energy Technologies, Kirkwall, Orkney, United Kingdom.
Bell, Michael C. ; Want, Andrew ; Burrows, Michael T. ; Venugopal, Vengatesan ; Waldman, Simon Mark ; Side, Jonathan Charles. / Effects of wave energy extraction on intertidal species of extremely exposed rocky shores. Abstract from International Conference on the Environmental Interactions of Marine Energy Technologies, Kirkwall, Orkney, United Kingdom.
@conference{4223cabac4ab4a99a9fcb91b31f3a7ba,
title = "Effects of wave energy extraction on intertidal species of extremely exposed rocky shores",
abstract = "Ecological responses to nearshore extraction of wave energy are expected to be most evident at the shore, where much of this energy would otherwise be expended. Extremely exposed shorelines are the best place to look for such responses, given that these are likely to be adjacent to the highest wave energy resources. Using survey data for the west coast of Mainland Orkney together with modelled wave height data from the EcoWatt 2050 project, we develop statistical models for the abundance of intertidal species characteristic of high exposure levels. Significant relationships with wave height are apparent for many species, even though all sites are at the high end of the spectrum of exposure, and shore topography is shown to be an important modifying factor. These models are projected for scenarios of future wave climate, demonstrating that climate change is expected to be the dominant driver of change in intertidal species. Both losses and gains are projected in response to extraction of wave energy, but these effects are relatively small. We discuss these findings in relation to uncertainties about other environmental drivers, and consider implications for acceptable levels of energy extraction.",
keywords = "Wave energy, Intertidal, Statistical modelling, climate change",
author = "Bell, {Michael C.} and Andrew Want and Burrows, {Michael T.} and Vengatesan Venugopal and Waldman, {Simon Mark} and Side, {Jonathan Charles}",
year = "2018",
month = "4",
day = "26",
language = "English",
note = "International Conference on the Environmental Interactions of Marine Energy Technologies, EIMR 2018 ; Conference date: 24-04-2018 Through 27-04-2018",
url = "https://www.egis.hw.ac.uk/eimr2018/",

}

Bell, MC, Want, A, Burrows, MT, Venugopal, V, Waldman, SM & Side, JC 2018, 'Effects of wave energy extraction on intertidal species of extremely exposed rocky shores' International Conference on the Environmental Interactions of Marine Energy Technologies, Kirkwall, Orkney, United Kingdom, 24/04/18 - 27/04/18, .

Effects of wave energy extraction on intertidal species of extremely exposed rocky shores. / Bell, Michael C.; Want, Andrew; Burrows, Michael T.; Venugopal, Vengatesan; Waldman, Simon Mark; Side, Jonathan Charles.

2018. Abstract from International Conference on the Environmental Interactions of Marine Energy Technologies, Kirkwall, Orkney, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

TY - CONF

T1 - Effects of wave energy extraction on intertidal species of extremely exposed rocky shores

AU - Bell, Michael C.

AU - Want, Andrew

AU - Burrows, Michael T.

AU - Venugopal, Vengatesan

AU - Waldman, Simon Mark

AU - Side, Jonathan Charles

PY - 2018/4/26

Y1 - 2018/4/26

N2 - Ecological responses to nearshore extraction of wave energy are expected to be most evident at the shore, where much of this energy would otherwise be expended. Extremely exposed shorelines are the best place to look for such responses, given that these are likely to be adjacent to the highest wave energy resources. Using survey data for the west coast of Mainland Orkney together with modelled wave height data from the EcoWatt 2050 project, we develop statistical models for the abundance of intertidal species characteristic of high exposure levels. Significant relationships with wave height are apparent for many species, even though all sites are at the high end of the spectrum of exposure, and shore topography is shown to be an important modifying factor. These models are projected for scenarios of future wave climate, demonstrating that climate change is expected to be the dominant driver of change in intertidal species. Both losses and gains are projected in response to extraction of wave energy, but these effects are relatively small. We discuss these findings in relation to uncertainties about other environmental drivers, and consider implications for acceptable levels of energy extraction.

AB - Ecological responses to nearshore extraction of wave energy are expected to be most evident at the shore, where much of this energy would otherwise be expended. Extremely exposed shorelines are the best place to look for such responses, given that these are likely to be adjacent to the highest wave energy resources. Using survey data for the west coast of Mainland Orkney together with modelled wave height data from the EcoWatt 2050 project, we develop statistical models for the abundance of intertidal species characteristic of high exposure levels. Significant relationships with wave height are apparent for many species, even though all sites are at the high end of the spectrum of exposure, and shore topography is shown to be an important modifying factor. These models are projected for scenarios of future wave climate, demonstrating that climate change is expected to be the dominant driver of change in intertidal species. Both losses and gains are projected in response to extraction of wave energy, but these effects are relatively small. We discuss these findings in relation to uncertainties about other environmental drivers, and consider implications for acceptable levels of energy extraction.

KW - Wave energy

KW - Intertidal

KW - Statistical modelling

KW - climate change

M3 - Abstract

ER -

Bell MC, Want A, Burrows MT, Venugopal V, Waldman SM, Side JC. Effects of wave energy extraction on intertidal species of extremely exposed rocky shores. 2018. Abstract from International Conference on the Environmental Interactions of Marine Energy Technologies, Kirkwall, Orkney, United Kingdom.