Effect of a cashmere breeding program on fibre length traits

H. Redden, D. Robson, S. M. Rhind

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)781-787
Number of pages7
JournalAustralian Journal of Agricultural Research
Volume56
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

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breeding

Keywords

  • Breeding
  • Cashmere
  • Fibres
  • Goats
  • Length
  • Quality

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Redden, H. ; Robson, D. ; Rhind, S. M. / Effect of a cashmere breeding program on fibre length traits. In: Australian Journal of Agricultural Research. 2005 ; Vol. 56, No. 8. pp. 781-787.
@article{fd5395c8451348e6a97cd89c0f5b3538,
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abstract = "<![CDATA[Two cashmere goat breed lines were selected, over a 5-year period, for increased mean cashmere weight (Value line; V) or reduced mean cashmere diameter (Fine line; F) and were compared with a group bred randomly (Control; C). The mean staple length of V animals increased from 42.2 to 52.0 mm (P < 0.001) between Years 1 and 5 and by Year 5 it was longer than that of F (43.9; P < 0.001) and C animals (45.2; P < 0.05). Between Years 1 and 5, the mean maximum drawn length of the V and F cashmere increased, from 50.9 to 63.1 mm (P < 0.001) and from 45.0 to 52.8mm (P < 0.001), respectively. The mean minimum length for the V line increased from 32.5 to 49.6 mm (P < 0.001). This was attributable to an increase in cashmere length in both males (P < 0.001) and females (P < 0.001). The mean minimum length for the F line increased (P < 0.001) primarily because of an increase in the mean minimum cashmere length of the females (P < 0.05). It is concluded that although the selection program resulted in an increase in cashmere production in the V line and no reduction in the F line animals, the associated increase in length and/or the changes in the relative length of the cashmere and guard hairs were likely to result in a reduction in fleece quality and value, particularly in the V animals. {\circledC} CSIRO 2005.]]>",
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Effect of a cashmere breeding program on fibre length traits. / Redden, H.; Robson, D.; Rhind, S. M.

In: Australian Journal of Agricultural Research, Vol. 56, No. 8, 2005, p. 781-787.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

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AU - Robson, D.

AU - Rhind, S. M.

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KW - Breeding

KW - Cashmere

KW - Fibres

KW - Goats

KW - Length

KW - Quality

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