Dual task performance may be a better measure of cognitive processing in Huntington’s disease than traditional attention tests

Eleftheria Vaportzis, Nellie Georgiou-Karistianis, Andrew Churchyard, Julie Stout

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND:
    Past research has found cancellation tasks to be reliable markers of cognitive decline in Huntington’s disease (HD).
    OBJECTIVE:
    The aim of this study was to extend previous findings by adopting the use of a dual task paradigm that paired cancellation and auditory tasks.
    METHODS:
    We compared performance in 14 early stage HD participants and 14 healthy controls. HD participants were further divided into groups with and without cognitive impairment.
    RESULTS:
    Results suggested that HD participants were not slower or less accurate compared with controls; however, HD participants showed greater dual task interference in terms of speed. In addition, HD participants with cognitive impairment were slower and less accurate than HD participants with no cognitive impairment, and showed greater dual task interference in terms of speed and accuracy.
    CONCLUSIONS:
    Our findings suggest that dual task measures may be a better measure of cognitive processing in HD compared with more traditional measures.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)119-130
    JournalJournal of Huntington's Disease
    Volume4
    Issue number2
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

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