Distribution of the burden of fisheries regulations in Europe: The north/south divide

Maria Hadjimichael, Gareth Edwards-Jones, Michel J. Kaiser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) is a priority area of the European Union's Better Regulation agenda. Understanding the spatial variation in the application of the policy and the reasons behind these differences would provide insights into policy making in different socioeconomic and cultural settings that will assist in better regulation. The CFP aqcuis (the body of European Union law accumulated thus far) was analysed by creating a database composed of pre-defined elements from each obligation. Distinct differences are apparent in the 'burden' imposed by regulations in the Northern and Southern waters. However, a combination of a timeline of fish landings and the accumulation of the CFP regulations shows that despite the increase in the number of regulations this has not led to the anticipated reduction in landings. Historical, biological and geopolitical differences between the two major marine regions of the EU are discussed in terms of the impact they have had on the formation of the different fisheries management models in the different regions. Finally, the elements forming these models are discussed in terms of successes and failures in the context of the 2012 CFP reform.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)795-802
Number of pages8
JournalMarine Policy
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2010

Keywords

  • Common Fisheries Policy
  • European Union
  • Fisheries management
  • Policy reform
  • Regulatory environment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
  • Law

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