Distraction from multiple in-vehicle secondary tasks: Vehicle performance and mental workload implications

Terry C. Lansdown, Nicola Brook-Carter, Tanita Kersloot

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    101 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This study investigates the impact of multiple in-vehicle information systems on the driver. It was undertaken using a high fidelity driving simulator. The participants experienced, paced and unpaced single tasks, multiple secondary tasks and an equal period of 'normal' driving. Results indicate that the interaction with secondary tasks led to significant compensatory speed reductions. Multiple secondary tasks were shown to have a detrimental affect on vehicle performance with significantly reduced headways and increased brake pressure being found. The drivers reported interaction with the multiple in-vehicle systems to significantly impose more subjective mental workload than either a single secondary task or 'normal driving'. The implications of these findings and the need to integrate and manage complex in-vehicle information systems are discussed.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)91-104
    Number of pages14
    JournalErgonomics
    Volume47
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 15 Jan 2004

    Keywords

    • Distraction
    • Driving
    • Multiple-task
    • Performance
    • Workload

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