Directional aspects of collision risk between passing ships and platforms: A North Sea case study

Julian Wolfram, Guilherme Naegeli

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    The risk of collision with a ship is now estimated to be the single largest source of risk for some North Sea offshore platforms. Current procedures for modelling risk due to passing ships are omni-directional, and no explicit consideration is usually given to the directions in which the ships are travelling relative to the faces of the platform. This paper examines the effect of ship direction upon collision risk through a case study using the COAST database and a simple new collision damage model. It is found that collision damage risk can vary significantly with direction. The paper argues that there could be significant improvements to the current practice in the modelling and estimating of collision risk. Copyright © 2004 by The International Society of Offshore and Polar Engineers.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceeedings of the Fourteenth International Offshore and Polar Engineering Conference
    Pages533-539
    Number of pages7
    Publication statusPublished - 2004
    EventFourteenth International Offshore and Polar Engineering Conference - Toulon, France
    Duration: 23 May 200428 May 2004

    Conference

    ConferenceFourteenth International Offshore and Polar Engineering Conference
    Abbreviated titleISOPE 2004
    CountryFrance
    CityToulon
    Period23/05/0428/05/04

    Keywords

    • Collision
    • Damage
    • Platform
    • Risk
    • Ship
    • Structural

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