Design of novel resonance domain diffractive optical elements

Malcolm T. Lightbody, Ben Layet, Mohammad R. Taghizadeh, Thomas H. Bett

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The key to effective utilization and systematic design of resonance domain diffractive elements lies in understanding the way in which the input beam interacts with the structure to produce the output field. This is straightforward in the paraxial, scalar, regime as the diffracted signal can be related directly to the physical parameters of the grating but resonance domain optics provides at least two exciting advantages over conventional optics. The first is the ability to use the wavelength scale structure to produce grating response functions with phase and/or amplitude modulations that cannot be realized conventionally. The second advantage is to use the polarization sensitivity of such devices to increase the functionality of a given element. We report on two novel uses of resonance domain diffractive optics. The first element is a diffractive optic beam deflector intended for high power laser systems, where laser induced damage limits the usefulness of conventional elements. The second element is a reflection grating operating as a polarization beam splitter. In the case of the beam splitter we present a simple model to explain the essential physics behind the operation of the device. This model leads to simple formulae for the design of other polarization sensitive devices.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Pages96-107
Number of pages12
Volume2404
Publication statusPublished - 1995
EventDiffractive and Holographic Optics Technology II - San Jose, CA, USA
Duration: 9 Feb 199510 Feb 1995

Conference

ConferenceDiffractive and Holographic Optics Technology II
CitySan Jose, CA, USA
Period9/02/9510/02/95

Fingerprint

diffractive optics
gratings
beam splitters
polarization
optics
deflectors
high power lasers
scalars
damage
physics
output
wavelengths
lasers

Cite this

Lightbody, M. T., Layet, B., Taghizadeh, M. R., & Bett, T. H. (1995). Design of novel resonance domain diffractive optical elements. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 2404, pp. 96-107)
Lightbody, Malcolm T. ; Layet, Ben ; Taghizadeh, Mohammad R. ; Bett, Thomas H. / Design of novel resonance domain diffractive optical elements. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 2404 1995. pp. 96-107
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Lightbody, MT, Layet, B, Taghizadeh, MR & Bett, TH 1995, Design of novel resonance domain diffractive optical elements. in Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 2404, pp. 96-107, Diffractive and Holographic Optics Technology II, San Jose, CA, USA, 9/02/95.

Design of novel resonance domain diffractive optical elements. / Lightbody, Malcolm T.; Layet, Ben; Taghizadeh, Mohammad R.; Bett, Thomas H.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 2404 1995. p. 96-107.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Lightbody MT, Layet B, Taghizadeh MR, Bett TH. Design of novel resonance domain diffractive optical elements. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 2404. 1995. p. 96-107