Culture change as identity regulation: The micro-politics of producing spatial planners in England

Andrew Inch

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    26 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Attempts to reform planning systems often draw into question the attitudes and commitments of the planners charged with realising change. Since 2001 the English planning system has been subject to a complex series of reforms designed to modernise its workings. Central to this have been calls for a culture change, focusing on professional planners in the public sector. The discourse of culture change is rooted in the managerialist thinking that has been central to longterm processes of state restructuring. Du Gay describes this as a project designed to change the identities of public servants. This article therefore explores the messy ways in which reform has sought to re-regulate the identities of English planners, and the response from planners themselves as they have begun to negotiate these changes to their identities and practices. It is argued that attentiveness to the lived experience of change can help to inform a more critical and nuanced account of the normative promises of planning reform. ©2010 Taylor & Francis.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)359-374
    Number of pages16
    JournalPlanning Theory and Practice
    Volume11
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

    Keywords

    • Culture change
    • Identity regulation
    • Identity work
    • Planners' identities
    • Planning reform

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