Cultural influences on student learning

John Cowan, Derek Fordyce

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    The writers report tentative studies of patterns of student learning and study behaviour in Aleppo, Syria, and Edinburgh, Scotland, involving mainly but not exclusively students of engineering. These enquiries suggest that there may be appreciable differences in perceptions of learning, habits of study and problem solving in the two universities concerned, which otherwise appear to have similar educational goals. The writers discuss their findings, and consider the implications if their pilot studies should be confirmed as a generalised distinction, following further research. They speculate that cultural differences may arise, perhaps more subtly, because of differences other than those which reflect merely national or religious cultures. They therefore volunteer these exploratory thoughts and experiences to stimulate further consideration of the whole issue of cultural influences on learning in higher education. © 1987.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)219-225
    Number of pages7
    JournalInternational Journal of Educational Development
    Volume7
    Issue number4
    Publication statusPublished - 1987

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    study behavior
    learning behavior
    Syria
    cultural difference
    learning
    habits
    student
    engineering
    university
    education
    experience

    Cite this

    Cowan, John ; Fordyce, Derek. / Cultural influences on student learning. In: International Journal of Educational Development. 1987 ; Vol. 7, No. 4. pp. 219-225.
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    Cowan, J & Fordyce, D 1987, 'Cultural influences on student learning', International Journal of Educational Development, vol. 7, no. 4, pp. 219-225.

    Cultural influences on student learning. / Cowan, John; Fordyce, Derek.

    In: International Journal of Educational Development, Vol. 7, No. 4, 1987, p. 219-225.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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