Creating a suitable space

A qualitative study of the cultural sensitivity of counselling provision in the voluntary sector in the UK

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Background: Despite the rapid expansion of counselling services in the UK, the take-up of the service by people from minority ethnic backgrounds, including Asian people, is low. Aims: To assess the accessibility and appropriateness of counselling service provision in the UK for Asian people. Methods: Thirty-eight Asian people (19 clients and 19 non-clients) were interviewed on their perceptions and preferences for counselling services. The perspectives of clients and non-clients were compared with each other and those of representatives of 13 counselling agencies including those which served primarily Asian and other minority ethnic groups and those which served the general population. Results: Both clients and non-clients generally viewed counselling provision positively. However, some of their specific needs and preferences related to understanding the nature of the service, choice of counsellor and language of counselling were currently unmet by both mainstream and minority ethnic agencies. Conclusion: The current compartmentalization of counselling services does not acknowledge the considerable heterogeneity of Asian people. While in the short term, minority ethnic agencies play a crucial role in filling the gaps left by mainstream services, in the long term, good practice must lie in culturally sensitive counselling provision for all. Declaration of interest: The study was funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation. © Shadowfax Publishing and Informa UK Ltd.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)593-604
    Number of pages12
    JournalJournal of Mental Health
    Volume15
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2006

    Fingerprint

    counseling
    national minority
    counselor
    best practice
    ethnic group
    minority
    language

    Keywords

    • Asian people
    • Counselling service provision

    Cite this

    @article{fb3296cd58c1415f941f499f32b0c4fd,
    title = "Creating a suitable space: A qualitative study of the cultural sensitivity of counselling provision in the voluntary sector in the UK",
    abstract = "Background: Despite the rapid expansion of counselling services in the UK, the take-up of the service by people from minority ethnic backgrounds, including Asian people, is low. Aims: To assess the accessibility and appropriateness of counselling service provision in the UK for Asian people. Methods: Thirty-eight Asian people (19 clients and 19 non-clients) were interviewed on their perceptions and preferences for counselling services. The perspectives of clients and non-clients were compared with each other and those of representatives of 13 counselling agencies including those which served primarily Asian and other minority ethnic groups and those which served the general population. Results: Both clients and non-clients generally viewed counselling provision positively. However, some of their specific needs and preferences related to understanding the nature of the service, choice of counsellor and language of counselling were currently unmet by both mainstream and minority ethnic agencies. Conclusion: The current compartmentalization of counselling services does not acknowledge the considerable heterogeneity of Asian people. While in the short term, minority ethnic agencies play a crucial role in filling the gaps left by mainstream services, in the long term, good practice must lie in culturally sensitive counselling provision for all. Declaration of interest: The study was funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation. {\circledC} Shadowfax Publishing and Informa UK Ltd.",
    keywords = "Asian people, Counselling service provision",
    author = "Gina Netto",
    year = "2006",
    month = "10",
    day = "1",
    doi = "10.1080/09638230600900132",
    language = "English",
    volume = "15",
    pages = "593--604",
    journal = "Journal of Mental Health",
    issn = "0963-8237",
    publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
    number = "5",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Creating a suitable space

    T2 - A qualitative study of the cultural sensitivity of counselling provision in the voluntary sector in the UK

    AU - Netto, Gina

    PY - 2006/10/1

    Y1 - 2006/10/1

    N2 - Background: Despite the rapid expansion of counselling services in the UK, the take-up of the service by people from minority ethnic backgrounds, including Asian people, is low. Aims: To assess the accessibility and appropriateness of counselling service provision in the UK for Asian people. Methods: Thirty-eight Asian people (19 clients and 19 non-clients) were interviewed on their perceptions and preferences for counselling services. The perspectives of clients and non-clients were compared with each other and those of representatives of 13 counselling agencies including those which served primarily Asian and other minority ethnic groups and those which served the general population. Results: Both clients and non-clients generally viewed counselling provision positively. However, some of their specific needs and preferences related to understanding the nature of the service, choice of counsellor and language of counselling were currently unmet by both mainstream and minority ethnic agencies. Conclusion: The current compartmentalization of counselling services does not acknowledge the considerable heterogeneity of Asian people. While in the short term, minority ethnic agencies play a crucial role in filling the gaps left by mainstream services, in the long term, good practice must lie in culturally sensitive counselling provision for all. Declaration of interest: The study was funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation. © Shadowfax Publishing and Informa UK Ltd.

    AB - Background: Despite the rapid expansion of counselling services in the UK, the take-up of the service by people from minority ethnic backgrounds, including Asian people, is low. Aims: To assess the accessibility and appropriateness of counselling service provision in the UK for Asian people. Methods: Thirty-eight Asian people (19 clients and 19 non-clients) were interviewed on their perceptions and preferences for counselling services. The perspectives of clients and non-clients were compared with each other and those of representatives of 13 counselling agencies including those which served primarily Asian and other minority ethnic groups and those which served the general population. Results: Both clients and non-clients generally viewed counselling provision positively. However, some of their specific needs and preferences related to understanding the nature of the service, choice of counsellor and language of counselling were currently unmet by both mainstream and minority ethnic agencies. Conclusion: The current compartmentalization of counselling services does not acknowledge the considerable heterogeneity of Asian people. While in the short term, minority ethnic agencies play a crucial role in filling the gaps left by mainstream services, in the long term, good practice must lie in culturally sensitive counselling provision for all. Declaration of interest: The study was funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation. © Shadowfax Publishing and Informa UK Ltd.

    KW - Asian people

    KW - Counselling service provision

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33749462039&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1080/09638230600900132

    DO - 10.1080/09638230600900132

    M3 - Article

    VL - 15

    SP - 593

    EP - 604

    JO - Journal of Mental Health

    JF - Journal of Mental Health

    SN - 0963-8237

    IS - 5

    ER -