Consumption of new zealand blackcurrant extract improves recovery from exercise-induced muscle damage in non-resistance trained men and women: A double-blind randomised trial

Julie E. A. Hunt*, Mariana O. C. Coelho, Sean Buxton, Rachel Butcher, Daniel Foran, Daniel Rowland, William Gurton, Heather Macrae, Louise Jones, Kyle S. Gapper, Ralph J. F. Manders, David G. King

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)
9 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: Blackcurrant is rich in anthocyanins that may protect against exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) and facilitate a faster recovery of muscle function. We examined the effects of New Zealand blackcurrant (NZBC) extract on indices of muscle damage and recovery following a bout of strenuous isokinetic resistance exercise. Methods: Using a double-blind, randomised, placebo controlled, parallel design, twenty-seven healthy participants received either a 3 g·day−1 NZBC extract (n = 14) or the placebo (PLA) (n = 13) for 8 days prior to and 4 days following 60 strenuous concentric and eccentric contractions of the biceps brachii muscle on an isokinetic dynamometer. Muscle soreness (using a visual analogue scale), maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), range of motion (ROM) and blood creatine kinase (CK) were assessed before (0 h) and after (24, 48, 72 and 96 h) exercise. Results: Consumption of NZBC extract resulted in faster recovery of baseline MVC (p = 0.04), attenuated muscle soreness at 24 h (NZBC: 21 ± 10 mm vs. PLA: 40 ± 23 mm, p = 0.02) and 48 h (NZBC: 22 ± 17 vs. PLA: 44 ± 26 mm, p = 0.03) and serum CK concentration at 96 h (NZBC: 635 ± 921 UL vs. PLA: 4021 ± 4319 UL, p = 0.04) following EIMD. Conclusions: Consumption of NZBC extract prior to and following a bout of eccentric exercise attenuates muscle damage and improves functional recovery. These findings are of practical importance in recreationally active and potentially athletic populations, who may benefit from accelerated recovery following EIMD.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2875
JournalNutrients
Volume13
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Aug 2021

Keywords

  • Anthocyanin
  • Exercise-induced muscle damage
  • New Zealand blackcurrant
  • Oxidative stress
  • Recovery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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