Compositional analysis by p-XRF and SEM-EDX of medieval window glass from Elgin Cathedral, Northern Scotland

Helen Margaret Spencer, K. Robin Murdoch, Jim Buckman, Alan Mark Forster, Craig J. Kennedy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Thirty shards of medieval window glass from Elgin Cathedral in north-east Scotland have been subjected to compositional analysis by portable X-ray fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy – energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Comparison with previous analytical studies suggests that the majority of the glass was probably produced in France, while a smaller group may have been made in Germany. Significant differences in base glass composition were observed between colours. Two distinct blue glasses compositions were identified. The composition of the grisaille paint differs from paint on the continent, providing the first evidence that it was made using local Scottish lead and iron pigments. This work represents the largest analytical study of Scottish medieval window glass yet undertaken and presents insights into the transfer of medieval materials, technologies and trade routes.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1018-1035
Number of pages18
JournalArchaeometry
Volume60
Issue number5
Early online date14 Mar 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2018

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Energy dispersive spectroscopy
Glass
Scanning electron microscopy
Paint
Chemical analysis
Pigments
Iron
Fluorescence
Color
X rays

Cite this

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abstract = "Thirty shards of medieval window glass from Elgin Cathedral in north-east Scotland have been subjected to compositional analysis by portable X-ray fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy – energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Comparison with previous analytical studies suggests that the majority of the glass was probably produced in France, while a smaller group may have been made in Germany. Significant differences in base glass composition were observed between colours. Two distinct blue glasses compositions were identified. The composition of the grisaille paint differs from paint on the continent, providing the first evidence that it was made using local Scottish lead and iron pigments. This work represents the largest analytical study of Scottish medieval window glass yet undertaken and presents insights into the transfer of medieval materials, technologies and trade routes.",
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Compositional analysis by p-XRF and SEM-EDX of medieval window glass from Elgin Cathedral, Northern Scotland. / Spencer, Helen Margaret; Murdoch, K. Robin; Buckman, Jim; Forster, Alan Mark; Kennedy, Craig J.

In: Archaeometry, Vol. 60, No. 5, 10.2018, p. 1018-1035.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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