Bouncing back from failure: The interactive impact of perceived controllability and stability on self-efficacy beliefs and future task performance

Pete Coffee*, Tim Rees, S. Alexander Haslam

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is limited empirical evidence of the relationship between attributions following failure and subsequent task performance. Two studies manipulated the perceived controllability and stability of causes of initial task failure and explored the impact of these factors on perceptions of self-efficacy and follow-up performance. Consistent with previous attributional and social identity theorizing, an induced belief that failure was both beyond control and unlikely to change led to lower self-efficacy and worse performance, relative to conditions in which outcomes were believed to be controllable and/or unstable. These findings point to the resilience of beliefs in personal self-efficacy, but suggest that where opportunities for self-enhancement are precluded, personal self-belief will be compromised and performance will suffer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1117-1124
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
Volume27
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2009

Keywords

  • Attributions
  • Behaviour
  • Self-enhancement
  • Social identity
  • Sport psychology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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