Balancing shared and distributed heaps on NUMA architectures

Malak Aljabri, Hans Wolfgang Loidl, Phil Trinder

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Due to the varying latencies between memory banks, efficient shared memory access is challenging on modern NUMA architectures. This has a major impact on the shared memory performance of parallel programs, particularly those written in languages with automatic memory management. This paper presents a performance evaluation of distributed and shared heap implementations of parallel Haskell on a state-of-the-art physical shared memory NUMA machine. The evaluation exposes bottlenecks in the shared-memory management, which results in limits to scalability beyond 25 out of the 48 cores. We demonstrate that a hybrid system, GUMSMP, that combines both distributed and shared heap abstractions consistently outperforms the shared memory GHC implementation on seven benchmarks by a factor of 3.3 on average. Specifically, we show that the best results are obtained when sharing memory only within a single NUMA region, and using distributed memory system abstractions across the regions.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
PublisherSpringer
Pages1-17
Number of pages17
Volume8843
ISBN (Print)978-3-319-14674-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Event15th International Symposium on Trends in Functional Programming 2014 - Soesterberg, Netherlands
Duration: 26 May 201428 May 2014

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume8843
ISSN (Print)03029743
ISSN (Electronic)16113349

Conference

Conference15th International Symposium on Trends in Functional Programming 2014
Abbreviated titleTFP 2014
Country/TerritoryNetherlands
CitySoesterberg
Period26/05/1428/05/14

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Theoretical Computer Science

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