Assessment of the survival of historic window glass at Newhailes, Edinburgh, using portable x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Window glass at Newhailes, a neo-Palladian villa located in Musselburgh, near Edinburgh, Scotland, was analysed using portable x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) spectroscopy. The elemental compositions of 512 panes of glass were collected and analysed. Twelve glass types were observed, falling into two main groups: plant-ash fluxed glass which can be dated from before c1835, and synthetic soda glass which dates after this time.(1) Of the glass panes analysed, only 134 panes remain which date from pre-1835. The majority of these panes of glass are located on the uppermost floor of the building, indicating that the lower two floors have had a higher rate of replacement. This can be partially explained through the unrestricted public access to the exterior of the building, leading to higher than anticipated levels of mechanical damage and/or vandalism. The balance of accessibility and conservation of built heritage with particular reference to window glass is discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)63-69
Number of pages7
JournalGlass Technology - European Journal of Glass Science and Technology Part A
Volume56
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Materials Chemistry

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