Arsenic in groundwater and its influence on exposure risks through traditionally cooked rice in Prey Vêng Province, Cambodia

A. O'Neill, D. H. Phillips, S. Kok, E. Chea, B. Seng, Bhaskar Sen Gupta  

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Arsenic (As) contamination of communal tubewells in Prey Vêng, Cambodia, has been observed since 2000. Many of these wells exceed the WHO As in drinking water standard of 10 µg/L by a factor of 100. The aim of this study was to assess how cooking water source impacts dietary As intake in a rural community in Prey Vêng. This aim was fulfilled by (1) using geostatistical analysis techniques to examine the extent of As contaminated groundwater in Prey Vêng and identify a suitable study site, (2) conducting an on-site study in two villages to measure As content in cooked rice prepared with water collected from tubewells and locally harvested rainwater, and (3) determining the dietary intake of As from consuming this rice. Geostatistical analysis indicated that high risk tubewells (>50 µg As/L) are concentrated along the Mekong River's east bank. Participants using high risk tubewells are consuming up to 24 times more inorganic As daily than recommended by the previous FAO/WHO provisional tolerable daily intake value (2.1 µg/kgBW/day). However, As content in rice cooked in rainwater was significantly reduced, therefore, it is considered to be a safer and more sustainable option for this region.© 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1072-1079
    Number of pages8
    JournalJournal of Hazardous Materials
    Volume262
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 15 Nov 2013

    Fingerprint

    Cambodia
    Groundwater
    Arsenic
    arsenic
    rice
    groundwater
    rainwater
    Oryza
    risk exposure
    province
    No-Observed-Adverse-Effect Level
    Banks (bodies of water)
    Water
    Cooking
    Food and Agricultural Organization
    Rural Population
    Rivers
    Potable water
    Drinking Water
    Contamination

    Keywords

    • Arsenic
    • Cambodia
    • Dietary intake
    • Groundwater
    • Rainwater harvesting
    • Traditionally cooked rice

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
    • Pollution
    • Waste Management and Disposal
    • Environmental Chemistry
    • Environmental Engineering

    Cite this

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    Arsenic in groundwater and its influence on exposure risks through traditionally cooked rice in Prey Vêng Province, Cambodia. / O'Neill, A.; Phillips, D. H.; Kok, S.; Chea, E.; Seng, B.; Sen Gupta  , Bhaskar.

    In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, Vol. 262, 15.11.2013, p. 1072-1079.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    AU - Phillips, D. H.

    AU - Kok, S.

    AU - Chea, E.

    AU - Seng, B.

    AU - Sen Gupta  , Bhaskar

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