Analysis of production brewing strains of yeast by DNA fingerprinting

P. Wightman, D. E. Quain, P. G. Meaden

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Production brewing strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were analysed by DNA fingerprinting, using a Southern blotting and hybridization procedure and employing the Tyl-15 transposon as a probe. The ability to differentiate readily between strains was very dependent on the restriction enzyme used to digest the DNA prior to Southern blotting and hybridization; the enzymes EcoRI, PstI and SalI were found to be particularly useful in this respect. The method was applicable to the differentiation of both ale and lager yeasts, and was sufficiently sensitive to distinguish between very closely related strains. DNA fingerprinting by this approach confirmed, for example, that a flocculent strain isolated during a production-scale fermentation with a lager yeast was genotypically different from the parent.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)90-94
    Number of pages5
    JournalLetters in Applied Microbiology
    Volume22
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - 1996

    Fingerprint

    DNA Fingerprinting
    Yeasts
    Southern Blotting
    Enzymes
    Fermentation
    Saccharomyces cerevisiae
    DNA

    Cite this

    Wightman, P., Quain, D. E., & Meaden, P. G. (1996). Analysis of production brewing strains of yeast by DNA fingerprinting. Letters in Applied Microbiology, 22(1), 90-94.
    Wightman, P. ; Quain, D. E. ; Meaden, P. G. / Analysis of production brewing strains of yeast by DNA fingerprinting. In: Letters in Applied Microbiology. 1996 ; Vol. 22, No. 1. pp. 90-94.
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    Wightman, P, Quain, DE & Meaden, PG 1996, 'Analysis of production brewing strains of yeast by DNA fingerprinting', Letters in Applied Microbiology, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 90-94.

    Analysis of production brewing strains of yeast by DNA fingerprinting. / Wightman, P.; Quain, D. E.; Meaden, P. G.

    In: Letters in Applied Microbiology, Vol. 22, No. 1, 1996, p. 90-94.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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