An empirical study of electricity and gas demand drivers in large food retail buildings of a national organisation

Maria S Spyrou, Kirk Shanks, Malcolm J Cook, James Pitcher, Richard Lee

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    22 Citations (Scopus)
    296 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Food retail buildings account for a measureable proportion of a country's energy consumption and resultant carbon emissions so energy-operating costs are key business considerations. Increased understanding of end-use energy demands in this sector can enable development of effective benchmarking systems to underpin energy management tools. This could aid identification and evaluation of interventions to reduce operational energy demand. Whilst there are a number of theoretical and semi-empirical benchmarking and thermal modelling tools that can be used for food retail building stocks, these do not readily account for the variance of technical and non-technical factors that can influence end-use demands.

    This paper discusses the various drivers of energy end-uses of typical UK food retail stores. It reports on an empirical study of one organisation's hypermarket stock to evaluate the influence of various factors on annual store electricity and gas demands. Multiple regression models are discussed in the context of the development and application of a methodology for estimating annual energy end-use demand in food retail buildings. The established models account for 75% of the variation in electricity demand, 50% of the variation in gas demand in stores without CHP and 77% of the variation in gas demand in stores with CHP
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)172-182
    Number of pages11
    JournalEnergy and Buildings
    Volume68
    Issue numberPart A
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2014

    Keywords

    • energy
    • empirical
    • retail

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Energy(all)

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'An empirical study of electricity and gas demand drivers in large food retail buildings of a national organisation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this