An electric road system or big batteries: Implications for UK road freight

Christopher de Saxe, Daniel Ainalis, John Miles, Philip Greening, Adam Gripton, Christopher Thorne, David Cebon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
114 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

An Electric Road System (ERS)—comprising a network of overhead cables to charge Heavy Goods Vehicles (HGVs) via a pantograph pick-up—is a cost-competitive solution to rapidly decarbonise the UK road freight sector. A major benefit over conventional battery electric HGVs is the reduction in battery capacities needed to fulfil logistics needs. In this study, we develop a detailed vehicle simulation model and use it to calculate the battery capacity requirements of real UK logistics journeys against a range of ERS network sizes and on-route static charging options. The results show that, averaged over all static charging scenarios, ERS reduces battery sizes by 41 %, 62 %, and 75 % for the ‘Light’ (2,750 km), ‘Medium’ (5,500 km) and ‘Heavy’ (8,500 km) ERS scenarios. Of the static charging scenarios, drop-off charging is shown to be more effective than rest stop charging at reducing battery sizes.
Original languageEnglish
Article number100210
JournalTransportation Engineering
Volume14
Early online date24 Oct 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2023

Keywords

  • Battery electric vehicles
  • Charging infrastructure
  • Electric road systems
  • Heavy goods vehicles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Automotive Engineering
  • Civil and Structural Engineering

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