Alcohol intake and cognitive abilities in old age: the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 study

Janie Corley, Xueli Jia, Caroline E. Brett, Alan J. Gow, John M. Starr, Janet A. M. Kyle, Geraldine McNeill, Ian J. Deary

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    29 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective: Moderate alcohol consumption has been associated with better cognitive performance in late adulthood, possibly by improving vascular health. Few studies have examined the potentially confounding roles of prior cognitive ability and social class in this relationship. Method: Participants were 922 healthy adults about 70 years old in the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 study, for whom there are IQ data from age 11. Alcohol consumption was obtained by self-report questionnaire. Cognitive outcome measures included general cognitive ability, speed of information processing, memory, and verbal ability. Results: Moderate to substantial drinking (> 2 units/day) was associated with better performance on cognitive tests than low-level drinking (

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)166-175
    Number of pages10
    JournalAging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition
    Volume25
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2011

    Keywords

    • DEMENTIA
    • childhood IQ
    • HEALTH
    • cognitive function
    • MENTAL-ABILITY
    • FOOD-FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE
    • DRINKING
    • alcohol
    • LIFE-STYLE
    • CHILDHOOD
    • ADULTS
    • aging
    • CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE
    • CONSUMPTION

    Cite this

    Corley, J., Jia, X., Brett, C. E., Gow, A. J., Starr, J. M., Kyle, J. A. M., McNeill, G., & Deary, I. J. (2011). Alcohol intake and cognitive abilities in old age: the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 study. Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition, 25(2), 166-175. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0021571