After the Council Tax: Impacts of Property Tax Reform on People, Places and House Prices

Chris Leishman, Glen Bramley, Mark Stephens, David Watkins, Gillian Young

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

Abstract

The Council Tax is widely discredited. Would taxing property values be fairer? Could such a tax help to reduce housing market volatility? This report assesses the likely impact of a property value tax.
• A progressive property value tax would reduce the size of median gross
bills by £279 a year compared to the Council Tax.
• Almost two-thirds of households would see bills fall by more than 10%,
while fewer than one-quarter would experience increases of more than
10%.
• A progressive property tax would reduce gross median bills for the poorest
tenth of households by £202, and increase them for the top tenth by
£184.
• Bills for people living in London would rise across the income distribution,
so London may have to be treated separately.
• A property tax could have a supporting role in reducing house price
volatility.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationYork
PublisherJoseph Rowntree Foundation
Number of pages51
ISBN (Electronic)978 1 90958 620 8
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2014

Fingerprint

House prices
Tax reform
Property tax
Tax
Property values
Median
Household
Price volatility
Housing market
Income distribution
Market volatility

Cite this

Leishman, C., Bramley, G., Stephens, M., Watkins, D., & Young, G. (2014). After the Council Tax: Impacts of Property Tax Reform on People, Places and House Prices. York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation.
Leishman, Chris ; Bramley, Glen ; Stephens, Mark ; Watkins, David ; Young, Gillian. / After the Council Tax: Impacts of Property Tax Reform on People, Places and House Prices. York : Joseph Rowntree Foundation, 2014. 51 p.
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Leishman, C, Bramley, G, Stephens, M, Watkins, D & Young, G 2014, After the Council Tax: Impacts of Property Tax Reform on People, Places and House Prices. Joseph Rowntree Foundation, York.

After the Council Tax: Impacts of Property Tax Reform on People, Places and House Prices. / Leishman, Chris; Bramley, Glen; Stephens, Mark; Watkins, David; Young, Gillian.

York : Joseph Rowntree Foundation, 2014. 51 p.

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

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AU - Watkins, David

AU - Young, Gillian

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Leishman C, Bramley G, Stephens M, Watkins D, Young G. After the Council Tax: Impacts of Property Tax Reform on People, Places and House Prices. York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation, 2014. 51 p.