Affordability and supply

The rural dimension

Glen Bramley, David Watkins

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    This article examines recent evidence on affordability, the need for affordable housing and patterns of housing supply across the urban-rural spectrum in England. It uses adapted versions of several models derived from previous research but incorporating relatively recent data to illuminate these issues. It is found that, whether measured at the local authority or ward level, rural areas are more affordable than urban areas, within broad regions and overall. Rural areas in the North and the Midlands have greater net needs mainly because of migration and a lack the supply of social housing. Rural areas (especially further north) have seen much more new building and net gains in housing stock over the past 10-20 years, and prices grew less in rural areas over the whole market cycle, despite evidence of continuing demand. © 2009 Taylor & Francis.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)185-210
    Number of pages26
    JournalPlanning Practice and Research
    Volume24
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2009

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    rural area
    affordable housing
    social housing
    urban area
    market
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    Cite this

    Bramley, Glen ; Watkins, David. / Affordability and supply : The rural dimension. In: Planning Practice and Research. 2009 ; Vol. 24, No. 2. pp. 185-210.
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    Affordability and supply : The rural dimension. / Bramley, Glen; Watkins, David.

    In: Planning Practice and Research, Vol. 24, No. 2, 2009, p. 185-210.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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