Advances in the study of naturally fractured hydrocarbon reservoirs: a broad integrated interdisciplinary applied topic

Guy H. Spence, Gary D. Couples, Tim G. Bevan, Roberto Aguilera, John W. Cosgrove, Jean Marc Daniel, Jonathan Redfern

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Naturally fractured reservoirs, within which porosity, permeability pathways and/or impermeable barriers formed by the fracture network interact with those of the host rock matrix to influence fluid flow and storage, can occur in sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic rocks. These reservoirs constitute a substantial percentage of remaining hydrocarbon resources; they create exploration targets in otherwise impermeable rocks, including under-explored crystalline basement, and they can be used as geological stores for anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Their complex fluid flow behaviour during production has traditionally proved difficult to predict, causing a large degree of uncertainty in reservoir development. The applied study of naturally fractured reservoirs seeks to constrain this uncertainty and maximize production by developing new understanding, and is necessarily a broad, integrated, interdisciplinary topic. Some of the methods, challenges and advances in characterizing the interplay of rock matrix and fracture networks relevant to fluid flow and hydrocarbon recovery are reviewed and discussed via the contributions in this volume.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in the Study of Fractured Reservoirs
PublisherGeological Society of London
Pages1-22
Number of pages22
Volume374
ISBN (Print)9781862393554
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 May 2014

Publication series

NameGeological Society special publication
Number1
Volume374
ISSN (Print)0305-8719
ISSN (Electronic)2041-4927

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ocean Engineering
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Geology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Advances in the study of naturally fractured hydrocarbon reservoirs: a broad integrated interdisciplinary applied topic'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this