Additive manufacturing of tissues and organs

Ferry P. W. Melchels, Marco A. N. Domingos, Travis J. Klein, Jos Malda, Paulo J. Bartolo, Dietmar W. Hutmacher

Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature review

Abstract

Additive manufacturing techniques offer the potential to fabricate organized tissue constructs to repair or replace damaged or diseased human tissues and organs. Using these techniques, spatial variations of cells along multiple axes with high geometric complexity in combination with different biomaterials can be generated. The level of control offered by these computer-controlled technologies to design and fabricate tissues will accelerate our understanding of the governing factors of tissue formation and function. Moreover, it will provide a valuable tool to study the effect of anatomy on graft performance. In this review, we discuss the rationale for engineering tissues and organs by combining computer-aided design with additive manufacturing technologies that encompass the simultaneous deposition of cells and materials. Current strategies are presented, particularly with respect to limitations due to the lack of suitable polymers, and requirements to move the current concepts to practical application. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1079-1104
Number of pages26
JournalProgress in Polymer Science
Volume37
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2012

Keywords

  • Additive manufacturing
  • Bioprinting
  • Biofabrication
  • Hydrogels
  • Tissue engineering
  • RAPID PROTOTYPING TECHNIQUES
  • CELL SHEET DETACHMENT
  • OF-THE-ART
  • ENGINEERING SCAFFOLDS
  • REGENERATIVE MEDICINE
  • HYALURONIC-ACID
  • IN-VITRO
  • MECHANICAL-PROPERTIES
  • BIODEGRADABLE SCAFFOLDS
  • PEG HYDROGELS

Cite this

Melchels, F. P. W., Domingos, M. A. N., Klein, T. J., Malda, J., Bartolo, P. J., & Hutmacher, D. W. (2012). Additive manufacturing of tissues and organs. Progress in Polymer Science, 37(8), 1079-1104. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.progpolymsci.2011.11.007
Melchels, Ferry P. W. ; Domingos, Marco A. N. ; Klein, Travis J. ; Malda, Jos ; Bartolo, Paulo J. ; Hutmacher, Dietmar W. / Additive manufacturing of tissues and organs. In: Progress in Polymer Science. 2012 ; Vol. 37, No. 8. pp. 1079-1104.
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Melchels, FPW, Domingos, MAN, Klein, TJ, Malda, J, Bartolo, PJ & Hutmacher, DW 2012, 'Additive manufacturing of tissues and organs', Progress in Polymer Science, vol. 37, no. 8, pp. 1079-1104. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.progpolymsci.2011.11.007

Additive manufacturing of tissues and organs. / Melchels, Ferry P. W.; Domingos, Marco A. N.; Klein, Travis J.; Malda, Jos; Bartolo, Paulo J.; Hutmacher, Dietmar W.

In: Progress in Polymer Science, Vol. 37, No. 8, 08.2012, p. 1079-1104.

Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature review

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AU - Melchels, Ferry P. W.

AU - Domingos, Marco A. N.

AU - Klein, Travis J.

AU - Malda, Jos

AU - Bartolo, Paulo J.

AU - Hutmacher, Dietmar W.

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AB - Additive manufacturing techniques offer the potential to fabricate organized tissue constructs to repair or replace damaged or diseased human tissues and organs. Using these techniques, spatial variations of cells along multiple axes with high geometric complexity in combination with different biomaterials can be generated. The level of control offered by these computer-controlled technologies to design and fabricate tissues will accelerate our understanding of the governing factors of tissue formation and function. Moreover, it will provide a valuable tool to study the effect of anatomy on graft performance. In this review, we discuss the rationale for engineering tissues and organs by combining computer-aided design with additive manufacturing technologies that encompass the simultaneous deposition of cells and materials. Current strategies are presented, particularly with respect to limitations due to the lack of suitable polymers, and requirements to move the current concepts to practical application. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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KW - Hydrogels

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KW - RAPID PROTOTYPING TECHNIQUES

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KW - OF-THE-ART

KW - ENGINEERING SCAFFOLDS

KW - REGENERATIVE MEDICINE

KW - HYALURONIC-ACID

KW - IN-VITRO

KW - MECHANICAL-PROPERTIES

KW - BIODEGRADABLE SCAFFOLDS

KW - PEG HYDROGELS

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Melchels FPW, Domingos MAN, Klein TJ, Malda J, Bartolo PJ, Hutmacher DW. Additive manufacturing of tissues and organs. Progress in Polymer Science. 2012 Aug;37(8):1079-1104. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.progpolymsci.2011.11.007