Abyssal food limitation, ecosystem structure and climate change

Craig R. Smith, Fabio De Leo, Angelo F. Bernadino, Andrew K. Sweetman, Pedro Martinez Arbizu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The abyssal seafloor covers more than 50% of the Earth and is postulated to be both a reservoir of biodiversity and a source of important ecosystem services. We show that ecosystem structure and function in the abyss are strongly modulated by the quantity and quality of detrital food material sinking from the surface ocean. Climate change and human activities (e.g. successful ocean fertilization) will alter patterns of sinking food flux to the deep ocean, substantially impacting the structure, function and biodiversity of abyssal ecosystems. Abyssal ecosystem response thus must be considered in assessments of the environmental impacts of global warming and ocean fertilization.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)518-528
Number of pages11
JournalTrends in Ecology and Evolution
Volume23
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2008

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food limitation
ecosystem structure
biodiversity
climate change
ecosystem response
food
ocean
global ocean
ecosystem function
ecosystem service
global warming
sea surface
environmental impact
human activity
seafloor
ecosystem
material

Cite this

Smith, Craig R. ; De Leo, Fabio ; Bernadino, Angelo F. ; Sweetman, Andrew K. ; Martinez Arbizu, Pedro. / Abyssal food limitation, ecosystem structure and climate change. In: Trends in Ecology and Evolution. 2008 ; Vol. 23, No. 9. pp. 518-528.
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Abyssal food limitation, ecosystem structure and climate change. / Smith, Craig R.; De Leo, Fabio; Bernadino, Angelo F.; Sweetman, Andrew K.; Martinez Arbizu, Pedro.

In: Trends in Ecology and Evolution, Vol. 23, No. 9, 09.2008, p. 518-528.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Smith, Craig R.

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AU - Bernadino, Angelo F.

AU - Sweetman, Andrew K.

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PY - 2008/9

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AB - The abyssal seafloor covers more than 50% of the Earth and is postulated to be both a reservoir of biodiversity and a source of important ecosystem services. We show that ecosystem structure and function in the abyss are strongly modulated by the quantity and quality of detrital food material sinking from the surface ocean. Climate change and human activities (e.g. successful ocean fertilization) will alter patterns of sinking food flux to the deep ocean, substantially impacting the structure, function and biodiversity of abyssal ecosystems. Abyssal ecosystem response thus must be considered in assessments of the environmental impacts of global warming and ocean fertilization.

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DO - 10.1016/j.tree.2008.05.002

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JF - Trends in Ecology and Evolution

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