A standardized assessment of geographic variation in size at maturity of European lobster (Homarus gammarus L.) in the North East Atlantic

Matthew Coleman, Matthew Garratt, Natalie Hold, Isobel S. M. Bloor, Stuart Rees Jenkins, Joanne Porter, Oliver Tully, Michael C. Bell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

41 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Assessing size at maturity for European lobster Homarus gammarus across the North East Atlantic remains a fundamental knowledge gap for this commercially valuable fishery. This study for the first time collates existing data on physiological maturity of female European lobster H. gammarus across the North East Atlantic, including new data from Scotland, Wales, and the Isle of Man. Physiological estimates of size at maturity were undertaken using 1309 lobsters from 11 locations using a standardized methodology. Carapace length (CL) at which 50% of the sampled population had reached physiological maturity (CL50) varied between populations, ranging from 82 to 92.5 mm. CL50 estimates reported here are broadly similar for historic population samples in England, but estimates for Irish samples were lower than previous results. The development of a H. gammarus specific staging guide and methodology in this study enables the future comparison of potential fluctuations in female size at maturity.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)911-922
Number of pages12
JournalICES Journal of Marine Science
Volume80
Issue number4
Early online date21 Feb 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 May 2023

Keywords

  • Ecology
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Oceanography
  • maturity
  • European lobster
  • fisheries
  • Homarus gammarus
  • reproduction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Aquatic Science
  • Oceanography
  • Ecology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A standardized assessment of geographic variation in size at maturity of European lobster (Homarus gammarus L.) in the North East Atlantic'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this